Student Feedback

uncle-teaching-with-old-school-overhead-projector

I encourage students to call me “Warner” because in many respects, I too am a student seeking to learn, explore, and grow. Although this is hard at first for some, especially younger students who are steeped in traditions of deference to “Herr Doktor, Professor.” But they make the transition after a couple of weeks. Then we’re all co-explorers in the wilderness of knowledge. We become able to engage in the give-and-take of real learning.

Teaching managers of the future while using my trusted overhead projector, as well as blackboard and internet technologies.

Below are samples of student feedback in the recent past. They give the pluses and the minuses of various perceptions for different courses, “the good, the bad, and the ugly,” as the old Clint Eastwood western movie put it.

  • Great course. Inspiring and thought provoking. It has increased my desire to serve and help others.
  • We should have more classes like this one to learn about other ways we can help others. Maybe there is a way to make this class more popular on campus. Mr. Woodworth is an excellent teacher and one of the best persons I’ve known at BYU. Keep him!
  • This has been the best class I have ever taken at BYU. I have felt more motivated to do good things and have learned more about life’s mission than in any other class. I greatly admire Warner and how he lives what he preaches about the United Order and helping the poor throughout the world. He has the talent of transmitting his love for what he does to his students. This class was also very practical because we had to work with a real NGO doing something that would really help them, not just theory. I honestly believe that this class has helped change the course of my life for the better.
  • I thought the book was a good resource and the change project was fun and allowed applicable application of what we learned in the book. I would have liked more in-class activities to practice some of the interventions discussed in the book. I also felt the professor tried to promote his own political viewpoints and agenda over what the class really wanted to learn. I did not appreciate the professor’s analogy of CEO’s and corporations generally representing the “dark side,” though I do appreciate him presenting a different perspective that what is generally taught in the business school.
  • Warner is a great man that truly makes the world a better place. I loved his insights and thought they were very appropriate for progressing towards eternal life. His lectures were interesting, informative, and relevant. I hope I will never forget the resolve I gained from this class to serve other people.
  • It is obvious Warner is an individual with profound experience. Would like to have more of his involvement in the projects to get feedback and direction. Also, would enjoy more hands-on, in-class activities of actually using the tools we learn about.
  • I came to really enjoy this class. The quiz questions were too random, though. The first book we read was good but I didn’t see the whole point of reading it for leadership; too much time was spent on it. Warner has a true passion and I respect him for sticking to his beliefs. I liked how we discussed things in class.
  • I really enjoyed this class, the interaction that we as a class had was valuable to my learning.
  • I love Warner! Good class. The reading material was good, but there was so much I sometimes skimmed. I know no student should ever say this, but a simple reading quiz once every other week would have motivated me to read more. Also, I know you tried to do this a lot, but it is really helpful to have as much material as possible that applies to students now. I don’t really have the means to go volunteer in a 3rd world country this summer, so I really appreciated it when you mentioned everyday things we could do (like giving a little extra money to fast offerings or something). The project was nice for that reason as well.
  • Knows the subject matter very well and gets the class involved.
  • Cut out the controversy and social commentating. Give more opportunities to be graded on something.
  • Wonderful class! Strongly influenced my thinking on what my life’s ultimate mission should be!
  • I would have liked a wider variety of organizational change theories rather than the central theme of worker ownership throughout the majority of the classes. It was helpful to hear the guest speakers.
  • The text (OB 321) was too verbose and distracting. It was often difficult to form thoughts from such a convoluted text in order to adequately address the quizzes.
  • The nonprofit consulting project turned out to be one of the (if not “the”) best learning experiences to date in this MOB program. The individual assessment project has also turned out to be very beneficial.
  • The class is a bit like playing hopscotch: you throw a rock and try to jump to some conclusion for the day that may have nothing to do with what you read or discussed.
  • I truly enjoyed this class. Much of what was discussed was a review given my past educational experiences; however, the reinforcement and new enlightenment takes on “already understood” topics was very beneficial. I wish more ties to the “spiritual” aspects could have been drawn out more; but respect the need to have a balance with the secular. What frustrated me, yet taught me a great deal (therefore, it was valuable experience) was the students’ inability to “look beyond the grade” and to “embrace their education.” I appreciated Warner’s patience with them and willingness to work within their limited perspective. Thank you Warner for a very positive experience.
  • Despite the stress, I enjoyed the subject material of the class. One thing I did like about the class was the group work. It is only fitting that in a “leadership” class, you work in groups. That was effective.
  • The main thing I got out of this class was the power of one. It made me want to be a righteous leader if I ever have the opportunity.
  • Thanks, this was a life-changing class. I won’t ever see the world in the same way. This was exactly the class I hoped it would be. Thanks for allowing us to do projects; I was able to learn and accomplish what I hoped to this semester. Thanks again.
  • This was an amazing class! It taught me so much about development and how It’s essential to combine both secular and Gospel principles to achieve true development. This course also taught me a deeper respect for the courage and persistence it takes to change things and to truly make a difference. Dr. Woodworth himself is an inspiring example of constantly reaching out to make things better. It was clear from his teaching that even the little things matter, as he showed appreciation and respect even for small efforts by small people (like students) who try to make the world better. I loved learning about the need to constantly challenge the system, realizing that everywhere, even inspired places like BYU need people to challenge the current practices to bring about positive change.
  • Muchas gracias!
  • I look forward to take another one of your classes.
  • Warner tried to teach us a lot about Martin Luther King, Jr. and Mahatma Gandhi as leaders. But I want to learn about GE’s Jack Welch and Enron’s Kenneth Lay as great managers. This class was a contradiction! The professor’s preference for heroes with black or brown skin really is a joke. What can they teach me?
  • I know that you have many examples from your career, and that was always interesting. Tell us more stories on how they relate to OB.
  • I have learned a lot and how I would use this info and some of the issues that companies deal with today.
  • I thought the mid-term and final exams covered too many chapters. Don’t work us so hard!
  • I think Warner could give students more of a clue as to how they are graded and distribute assignments better throughout the semester. The guest lecturers were sometimes unsure of their purpose in lecturing to our class.
  • Great class, learned a lot. Everyone should take this class.
  • The course is designed for MBA students, which I am not, so it was difficult for me to understand many of the concepts. More could probably be done to help those who don’t have a business or development background. The most important stuff came across just fine, though.
  • Woodworth helped me to see how my life and also the gospel are connected with the broader society and contemporary world problems. It was amazing examining social structures at different cultures and places. I got a better understanding of the roots of inequality, analyzing critical questions about society and government actions. In each class we were moved outside the classroom, being able to experience throughout teacher’s lectures, personal research and readings, a more close contact with deprived people in underdeveloped societies. Moreover I was inspired to develop the tools to make a difference for good in my country and be an agent of change in the world.
  • This class was an eye opener for me and Professor Woodworth was excellent in shaking up our comfort zones.
  • One big problem with this class was the OLS department scheduling: with the big gap between a class Monday and not again until Friday–too long a gap to cover two chapters of reading.
  • I’ve been looking forward to taking this class for years, and it was wonderful. Thank you!
  • Doctor Woodworth is an example about what a person can do when one is sensitive about people who are suffering.
  • Professor Woodworth’s commitment to following the Savior’s example by literally feeding His sheep and helping the poor, the orphaned, the widows, and those who are less fortunate, is an inspiration for a poor sot like me who really needs to learn more about giving and sharing. Warner has forced me to ask some really hard questions about who I am, and what I’m doing with my life, and whether I’m doing things for my own benefit or for the benefit of those around me who are less fortunate.
  • Please continue and be strong in all you do. Thank you, Warner.
  • This class was invaluable. I learned so much. At first I felt unprepared for this type of course, but we started with the basics and quickly moved on. This class has inspired me to be a better person and a better leader.
  • Gave me great insight on the type of leader I can become in an informal setting.
  • I loved it, the class expanded my way of thinking in an open environment. Unlike some other university courses I have taken, I wanted to learn. I wanted to do the work as opposed to feeling obligated. This truly facilitated my personal growth.
  • Who in the h*** do you think you are? I didn’t come to the busines school to learn about Mormon economics or righteous leadership! Give me a break!
  • Much of the focus was on business leadership. Sometimes, especially while reading the Zion book, it felt like this was merely an economics class. I think it would be helpful to talk more about other aspects of leadership that we might be involved in, such as community, club, or church positions. Not everyone in the class will be starting their own company or becoming CEO.
  • I enjoyed this class, and it taught me a lot about the church and becoming a more contributing member of the church. Warner really knew his stuff.
  • I enjoyed the course, especially the Zion book. I felt that it did produce new knowledge and skills in me. I felt that I developed in a positive way this semester largely due to the subject matter Warner taught in class. I am grateful that I had this class before leaving BYU. However, I didn’t feel like Warner particularly cared about us (me) as students. I don’t think that he knew my name–even though the class was not exceptionally large, I participated daily, and used a name card often. I felt like his propriety was to other projects that he was doing. I once visited his office and felt that he was too busy to talk to me.
  • He’s incredible.
  • I really liked the approach to the subject matter, but didn’t like the course layout. I think more assignments throughout the semester would be helpful to take some pressure off only a few random quizzes and a final project.
  • What I liked most was Professor Woodworth’s maxims and sage sayings. Our study group called them “Warnerisms.”
  • Great job on helping students collaborate together and know each other, presenting a lot of info, encouraging multiple perspectives, and getting students to make the initiative both inside and outside class. I loved studying/reading/talking about real life cases and getting so much perspective and also analytical thoughts from people. I wonder if there is some way to help us apply more of the info, because there just seemed like so much. But, I know that making us get involved outside of the classroom is great and helped add to my educational experience. Thanks, you’re awesome.
  • I love the subject and Dr. Woodworth is a great teacher. I think there should be more accountability to make sure the students do the reading. The length of the reading for each class sometimes seemed overwhelming, so I didn’t read. I like the idea of a semester project, and the class discussions are great, but I would also like smaller assignments with some of the readings so that we get into the readings more. It would also help to have checkpoints on the semester project. Other than that–the course was great and inspiring–I want to be more involved in development and give more of myself to build the kingdom. Thanks!
  • He is a good instructor and a blessing to BYU.
  • Warner, You have been and always will be one of the most excellent examples of a life of service. Please share even more experiences of your learnings, your services and accomplishment in supporting people, communities, and individuals in various parts of the world you have been involved in. As far as the class, I think the reading was definitely a lot, all very important for us to undersand the issues and theories. Yet, for me personally it was a little overwhelming as I had so many other credits that most of the time it was hard or impossible to finish all my reading and do it in a manner that I would remember it. Skimming through was usually what I did despite the fact that those pages were the most useful and important for my preparation and the type of work I will be involved in. Thank you for your outstanding, lifelong example. Warner, not just I enjoyed the preparation you gave us but mostly, I know all of this will not mean anything unless I actually start working on it! And I will, guaranteed. You did your part, just as those that came before you like Mother Teresa, and the many today that are putting the gospel in full practice, between you and Mother Teresa or other great souls, indeed, there is not much difference. You’ve done a lot Warner, that is the greatest example to me. Thank you for mentoring us, with your spirit and knowledge. The responsibility is here, it will never go away. I just pray I personally will have the strength and commitment to really act, not to only have the desire.
  • Warner really helped me understand some of the bigger issues that are happening in the world. In particular, his experience with serving the needy and poor in many countries of the world was very inspiring. He was very helpful in understanding where my priorities should lie and want balance I need to keep between business pursuits and serving my brothers and sisters. I think this class (OB 321) was more effective in teaching that than the Management Suite was.
  • I thought the mid-term and final exams covered too many chapters. I felt like the lectures in class were sometimes just rehashing the reading.
  • There was too little correlation between the assigned reading for the day, and the class lecture on that day.
  • You should use online quizzes as well as occasional in-class quizzes to reinforce more of the topics covered.
  • This class has changed my life. It opened my mind to new viewpoints, problems, solutions, and ways to live. It could have been better organized, and I would have liked to know about grades more, but that is overshadowed by the real material of the class–how to live the gospel of Jesus Christ in your professional life. We can change the world, and we must.
  • “If we value independence, if we are disturbed by the growing conformity of knowledge, of values, of attitudes, which our present system induces, then we may wish to set up conditions of learning which make for uniqueness, for self-direction, and for self-initiated learnings.”
  •     —Carl Rogers, psychotherapist
  • Warner, when some of us MBAs started this ethics course, I at first thought you were playing the role of the devil’s advocate. Now at the end, I’m thinking you really are the devil!
  • This course is too hard, too much reading, too many assignments, too high expectations, too many tests. It’s just way too hard. Woodworth, loosen up like other faculty do!
  • The class was not only an excellent introduction to organizational behavior, but also what some of us call “Warnerology 101.”
  • Warner is a very inspiring teacher. I learned a lot from the class about how to accomplish my goals and dreams.
  • I didn’t put “Very Strongly Agree” in all these spaces because it was easy. I did it because I very strongly agree that this course was one of the best I have ever taken at BYU and this professor is the best kept secret on campus. EVERYONE should be able to take a class from Warner! He is constantly showing us how we can go forth to serve and how needed we are as Latter-day Saints in the international community. I do not know a better way to inspire the student body of BYU to take action and improve the world upon leaving the university than by taking Waner’s class on Third World Development.
  • Very cool class.
  • By far the greatest class I have taken at BYU. This class should be a requirement class for all students. Professor Woodworth is the best teacher I have ever had or met at BYU. I can’t praise him or his class enough. Thank you!
  • “It’s only when we truly know and understand that we have a limited time on earth—and that we have no way of knowing when our time is up—that we will begin to live each day to the fullest, as if it were the only one we had.”
  •     — Elizabeth Kubler-Ross, author of On Death and Dying